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Dragon Quest V

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Main series games
Dragon Quest V: Hand of the Heavenly Bride
DQVDS boxart
American boxart
Developer(s) Chunsoft
ArtePiazza, Matrix Software (PS2)
ArtePiazza, Cattle Call (NDS)
Publisher(s) Enix Corporation (SFC)
Square Enix (PS2, NDS)
Designer(s) Yūji Horii
Artist(s) Akira Toriyama
Composer(s) Koichi Sugiyama
Series Dragon Quest
Platform(s) Super Famicom
PlayStation 2
Nintendo DS
Android
iOS
Release date(s) Super Famicom

JP September 27, 1992
PlayStation 2
JP March 25, 2004
Nintendo DS
JP July 17, 2008
NA February 17, 2009
EU February 20, 2009
AUS February 19 2009
Android & iOS
JP TBA

Genre(s) Console role-playing game
Mode(s) Single player
Rating(s) CERO: A (PS2, NDS)
ESRB: E10+ (NDS)
PEGI: 12+ (NDS)
Media 16-megabit cartridge (SFC)
DVD (PS2)
Nintendo DS Game Card

Dragon Quest V: Hand of the Heavenly Bride is the fifth installment in the Dragon Quest series. It was the first Dragon Quest title to be released for the Nintendo Super Famicom. It was later re-released for the Playstation 2 and Nintendo DS, the latter being the first time it was released outside of Japan.

Along with Dragon Quest VI, the original Super Famicon release never reached North America. In the absence of an official translation, several fan translations exist for the Super Famicom version, as well as the PS2 version.

Dragon Quest V was the first game in the series in which certain monsters from random encounters may offer to join the player's party. Later, the same concept would spawn the Dragon Quest Monsters series.

Gameplay

Dragon Quest V follows in the footsteps of Dragon Quest IV by having unique divisions between segments of the game. Rather than using chapters, the game follows the life of the hero from childhood to adulthood to parenthood. This divides the game into 3 separate eras. It retains all of the typical elements of a Dragon Quest RPG with respect to enemies, levels, equipment, etc.

Monster recruitment

See main article, Monster recruitment in Dragon Quest V

The largest gameplay addition was the inclusion of a monster recruitment system. Under this system, certain monsters may elect to join the player's party after being defeated in battle. These monsters then behave as typical player characters who can level up, use equipment, and receive orders/tactics in battle. Only specific monsters may be recruited and many have very low probability of joining the player's party. This new feature adds a great deal of replay value as it greatly increases the possible party configurations a player can use.

Knick-Knacks

Throughout the game, many special items called knick-knacks may be collected by the player. These items can be displayed in a special museum; NPCs will be attracted to the museum once it has exhibits. The museum curator sometimes offers gold in exchange for the special product exhibits. Some special products will be upgraded by certain plot events. Knick-knacks are unrelated to the overall plot of the game and exist only as a sidequest.

Vehicles

There are multiple vehicles in the game used for traveling to various locations. In addition to the typical ship vehicle, there are several additional vehicles.

  • Magic carpet: It can travel on grass, water, and shoals, and will suppress wandering monster encounters due to its high speed. It can be carried as an item, allowing it to be used anywhere where there is a sufficient region of grass to take off. However, it cannot travel through forests, so a line of forest inside a line of water (or vice versa) remains an impassible barrier.
  • The Sky Castle: It can fly over any terrain; but it cannot reach or pass the high mountain on the central continent where the Great Temple is located. It can only land or take off from grass (and only large areas of grass, due to its size). The Return spell will not relocate the castle, although it is itself a valid Return target.
  • The Master Dragon: The Master Dragon can also fly over any terrain, and moreover can reach the Great Temple on the mountain. He may be called with the "Bell of the Dragon" item, given by the dragon towards the end of the game. Like the carpet and Castle, the Master Dragon can only drop or pick up the party from grassy locations. He cannot reach the Dark World, so the Bell will have no effect there.

Other new features

  • In this game it is possible to use katakana and numbers to name characters; earlier games had only allowed the use of hiragana. Also, message windows can now display kanji.
  • Search, Talk, and Open commands can now be issued by a single button press, bypassing the menu.
  • Combat screens now have background images, as in the first game. The images actually depend on the local terrain. Also, attacking a monster or casting an offensive spell will produce a matching animation.
  • The original SNES version only allows 3 active party members instead of 4; a 5-person wagon is still available, however.
  • The shop interface now shows what stat changes will occur when a weapon is equipped, and can equip purchased items automatically.
  • Characters can now move a half-block tile at a time rather than only a full block.
  • There is now a separate Defense stat, determining a character's base defense; in earlier games the base defense was calculated from other statistics.
  • Boomerangs and whips, for the first time, can attack multiple enemies.
  • Some traditional spells had their effects slightly altered.
  • Pots, barrels, and similar objects can now be Searched, and will often contain useful items.

Combat system

Dragon Quest V features a more advanced party AI than Dragon Quest IV. There is a "learn" strategy, which improves much faster than its counterpart in the previous game. It is also possible, unlike in the previous game, to set PCs to command mode, allowing them to be controlled individually as in the first three games rather than being automated.

Also, the mechanism for replacing characters with reinforcements from the wagon was changed. It no longer takes a turn for a character to be swapped with one in the wagon, and it is possible to replace all characters at once. This significantly changes battle strategy, especially against major bosses.

For the first time, any character who is targetting an already-dead monster will have their target automatically transferred to one of the other monsters (selected at random). In earlier games, the action was simply cancelled.

Chimera wings and the Zoom spell

The Chimera wing item will transport the party to the last town they visited, as in the earliest games of the series; but the Zoom spell will take them to the town of their choice as in the later games. The Zoom spell can only be acquired at a certain stage of the plot (in the first half of the second era); it cannot be acquired by leveling, and monsters with this spell will not appear until the plot event occurs. This marks the first time in the series that spell acquisition has been tied to plot events.

Characters

Setting

Dragon Quest V is set years after the Zenithian Hero defeated Psaro on its previous installment, Dragon Quest IV. The game starts at Littlehaven, with the Hero leaving to go to Whealbrook. Like all other Dragon Quest games, this one takes place in a medieval world, with no real modern technology, such as cars or electricity. Characters fight with swords, clubs, and magic instead of guns or other weapons.

The layout of the world is similar to the layout in Dragon Quest IV, but with a new set of locations, and considerable geographic alteration. The Tower of Heaven and Castle Zenithia are the only surviving locations from the previous game, and they have fallen into ruin and are no longer connected. The overworld has different monster encounter tables for each of the three eras.

The quest takes the Hero and his party to many exotic locations, such as a fairy village, a mansion made of ice, several caves, and a volcano. The party eventually makes its way to the castle Zenithia, which is a castle in each game of the Zenithia trilogy. Like a few other Dragon Quest games, the final enemies reside in a dark world, separate from the main map.

Legacy

PS2 remake

Square Enix released a PlayStation 2 enhanced remake of Dragon Quest V on March 25, 2004, with first day sales of 722,000. As of April 2004, the game has sold over 1.5 million copies making it the top selling Dragon Quest remake game of all-time, and is available in Japan as a Square Enix Ultimate Hits title. The remake was developed by former Dragon Quest VII art directors, Artepiazza. It features 3D graphics that are similar to Dragon Quest VII, but it utilizes the extra PlayStation 2 graphical capabilities. The Hero and his companions have to fight more monsters in the PlayStation 2 remake than they did in the Super Famicom original, but the character limit on the party has been increased from three to four. Also, there were only 40 monsters available to the player's party in the Super Famicom version of Dragon Quest V due to ROM limitations. The PlayStation 2 remake, however, does not suffer from this restriction. The music is performed by the NHK Symphony.

Another new feature in the remake is the "Yuuji's Specialty Museum," where the player has to collect local specialties from all around the world, return the items back to a character named "Yuuji," and receive rewards for them. The Dragon Quest V remake is the third Dragon Quest release in the Square Enix name (after Kenshin Dragon Quest and Slime Morimori Dragon Quest). Lastly, a Dragon Quest VIII preview video disc is included in the Japanese release of Dragon Quest V remake.

A fan translation of the PS2 version is currently being worked on by Kojiro Translations.

The engine of the PS2 remake is similar to the one used in Dragon Quest VII. Like Dragon Quest VII, there is a pseudo-3D view replacing the original bird's eye view. The graphics are updated accordingly. There is also a preview of Dragon Quest VIII bundled with the remake.

  • The “Bag” is available from the start of the game; so the Vault is replaced with a Bank.
  • There are now 10 possible names for the Baby Panther, instead of 4.
  • The Monster Depository can now store 200 monsters instead of 50.
  • Monster companions can now have their names changed.
  • One can talk to companions while traveling in the overworld.
  • Pots, barrels, and similar objects can now be picked up and thrown.
  • The AI modes are updated to match the ones used in Dragon Quest VII.
  • The "Paralysis" status effect will now wear off after several turns.
  • Items now sell for 50% of their purchase price, instead of 75%.
  • Some new spells and specialty attacks have been added.
  • The first-level fire spell, MERA or Blaze, can now be cast by the hero's daughter; in the previous game there was no way to obtain it.
  • There can now be 4 active party members in battle, instead of 3. Enemies appear in concomitantly larger groups, even in the early parts of the game when there are 3 or fewer party members anyway.
  • Stat gains on level-up are now randomized.
  • There are now 70 potential species of monster companion, instead of 40.
  • Bosses are much more powerful.
  • Some town and dungeon maps are redesigned.
  • There are now Sugoroku boards as in Dragon Quest III.
  • The casino now offers poker in addition to its other games; the party's slime companion, if any, can be entered in the Slime Race.
  • Save games now display a picture of the party's surroundings as a reminder.
  • The marriage system is different than in the original.
  • Gema now plays a more significant role in the plot.

DS remake

A Dragon Quest V remake for the Nintendo DS was announced in late 2007 by Square Enix. The game uses the same engine as the DS remake of Dragon Quest IV.

On April 23, 2008, it was reported that Square Enix has applied for the trademark "Hand of the Heavenly Bride" at the United States Patent and Trademark Office. It was confirmed to be in reference to Dragon Quest V by a listing from Nintendo of third-party titles for Nintendo platforms. On the following day, Square Enix sent out a press release saying that the game will be released in Europe under the name Dragon Quest: The Hand of the Heavenly Bride.

Reception

Like the other games in the series, Dragon Quest V was very popular in Japan.In 2006, the Japanese gaming magazine Famitsu had readers vote on the top one hundred games of all time, Dragon Quest V coming in at 11 and the PS2 remake at number 40. In particular, the way the story is divided by different periods of time has been praised, as it is something that has not appeared in many video games. Dragon Quest V has also been acknowledged as Yuji Horii's favourite in the series.

Soundtrack

Koichi Sugiyama composed the music and directed all the associated spinoffs. A compilation of Dragon Quest V's music was put on the album Dragon Quest V ~Bride of the Heavens~ Symphonic Suite, was released in 1992 and then again in 2000. The first version features an extra disc with the original soundtrack as well as the symphonic one. Here is the tracklisting of the Symphonic Suite:

  1. Overture (1:59)
  2. Castle Trumpeter (2:21)
  3. Melody in an Ancient Town ~ Toward the Horizon ~ Casino ~ Lively Town ~ Melody in an Ancient Town (7:50)
  4. Magic Carpet ~ The Ocean (7:39)
  5. Melody of Love (3:00)
  6. Monsters in the Dungeon ~ Tower of Death ~ Dark World ~ Monsters in the Dungeon (6:20)
  7. Violent Enemies ~ Almighty Boss Devil Is Challenged (5:44)
  8. Noble Requiem ~ Saint (5:53)
  9. Satan (4:52)
  10. Heaven (2:57)
  11. Bridal Waltz (3:39)

Related media

Dragon Quest Tenkuu Monogatari (Tale of the Air) is a twelve-volume manga series based on Dragon Quest V by Chino Yukimiya, which ran in 1997, and again in 2001. The story follows Sora and Ten, the two children from Dragon Quest V.

The main character of the 2011 Japanese Drama series "The Hero Yoshihiko and the Demon King's Castle"(a comedy series cemented within the Dragon Quest world) is heavily based on the design of the Hero character within Dragon Quest V.

See also

List of Monsters in Dragon Quest V

References

Smallwikipedialogo  This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).
Smallwikipedialogo  This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia-ja (view authors).


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