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Torneko no Daibouken: Fushigi no Dungeon

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Torneco no Daibouken: Fushigi no Dungeon
Torneko's-Dungeon
Torneco no Daibouken: Fushigi no Dungeon, a stand-alone game released only in Japan.
Developer(s) Chunsoft
Publisher(s) Chunsoft
Composer(s) Kōichi Sugiyama
Series Mysterious Dungeon
Platform(s) SNES
Release date(s) JP September 19, 1993
Genre(s) Console role-playing game, Roguelike
Mode(s) Single-player

Torneko no Daibōken: Fushigi no Dungeon (Japanese: 不思議のダンジョン トルネコの大冒険 Torneko's Great Adventure: Mysterious Dungeon) is the first game in the Mysterious Dungeon series. This installment features Torneko (or Taloon, as he was known in North America), the merchant from Dragon Warrior IV. The game involves Torneko adventuring around in the "Mysterious Dungeon" in search of items. It takes place after the events of Dragon Quest IV - in fact, the game's introduction opens up to a flashback featuring the original NES sprites.

Gameplay

The gameplay is similar to roguelike style PC games. The main similarity is the heavy use of randomized dungeons and effects.

While Torneko explores the dungeon, he collects items and fights monsters, similar to the ones found in Dragon Quest games. If Torneko leaves the dungeon, he can sell off the items he found. He can also equip certain items found in the dungeon. By saving up money, Torneko can improve his home and shop.

Music

As with other games in the Dragon Quest series, the musical score for the game was composed by Kōichi Sugiyama. Sony Records released the soundtrack, titled Suite Torneko's Great Adventure: Musical Chemistry, on October 21, 1993 in Japan. It contains eight arranged tracks performed by a chamber orchestra, as well as three tracks containing original game music.

Reception

In 2006, the game was voted number 78 by the readers of Famitsu magazine in its top 100 games of all time.

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